Turbolence flight Moscow-Bangkok, 27 injured

Earlier today, May 1st, several passengers received injuries when a Boeing 777 airplane on flight SU 270 from Moscow to Bangkok passed through a zone of sudden strong short-term turbulence about 40 minutes before arrival in Bangkok.

An experienced crew piloted the flight. The pilot has more than 23 thousand flight hours, and the co-pilot has over 10.5 thousand flight hours. However, the turbulence that hit the Boeing 777 was impossible to foresee. The incident was caused by what is known in aviation as "clear-air turbulence". Such turbulence occurs without any clouds, in clear skies with good visibility, and weather radar is unable to alert of its approach. In such situations, the crew is unable to warn passengers of the need to return to their seats. There are around 750 cases of clear-air turbulence recorded in civil aviation every year.

The crew successfully landed at Bangkok airport at 03.38 Moscow time.

There were 313 passengers on board, 25 of whom were admitted to Bangkok hospitals for treatment.

Eleven have already been discharged, and the rest are still receiving medical care.

Media reports suggesting that some passengers received spinal compression fractures are inaccurate and have been completely refuted by medical professionals who are treating the passengers.

Aeroflot representatives and staff at the Russian Federation Embassy in Bangkok are in touch with those who have suffered injuries, and are providing assistance. Aeroflot will cover all expenses related to passengers’ medical treatment.

News update

None of the 27 passengers of the Boeing 777 that flew from Moscow to Bangkok has serious or life-threatening injuries, according to information from the medical institutions in Thailand’s capital that are treating the victims. 

None of the passengers suffered spinal compression fractures. Fifteen Russian Federation citizens and two citizens of Thailand currently remain hospitalised. The remaining passengers were discharged after a medical examination. The patients that are still under doctors’ care have contusions, and several have fractured or broken bones.

Aeroflot representatives and employees of the Consulate of the Russian Federation in Bangkok are in contact with the victims to provide them with assistance. Aeroflot’s Bangkok office is assisting with hotel booking cancellations, changing check-in dates, as well as re-ticketing of transfer passengers’ flights to their final destinations, as and when needed. All costs related to re-ticketing, as well as expenses for passengers’ medical treatment, will be fully covered by the airline.

Aeroflot’s contact centre has opened a dedicated telephone line for relatives of passengers of flight SU 270. For information about injured passengers, please call +7-495-664-0000.

Earlier today, May 1st, several passengers received injuries when a Boeing 777 airplane on flight SU 270 from Moscow to Bangkok passed through a zone of sudden strong short-term turbulence about 40 minutes before arrival in Bangkok. An experienced crew piloted the flight. The pilot has more than 23 thousand flight hours, and the co-pilot has over 10.5 thousand flight hours. However, the turbulence that hit the Boeing 777 was impossible to foresee. The incident was caused by what is known in aviation as "clear-air turbulence". Such turbulence occurs without any clouds, in clear skies with good visibility, and weather radar is unable to alert of its approach. In such situations, the crew is unable to warn passengers of the need to return to their seats. There are around 750 cases of clear-air turbulence recorded in civil aviation every year.

The crew successfully landed at Bangkok airport at 03.38 Moscow time.

 

Press release by Aeroflot